Bearing and Covering Shame

August 4, 2019 Speaker: Rick Negley Series: Psalms

Scripture: Psalm 31:1–31:24

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Bearing and Covering Shame

(Psalm 31:1-24)




1. Shame Is an Ever-Present Reality in a Fallen World

Many books have been written on the topic of shame.

Shame is the experience of being publicly exposed to humiliation.

King David was guilty of adultery and murder.

David prayed, “Let me never” or “not be put to shame” (vv. 1, 17). Shame was not always part of human experience (Genesis 2:25).

Shame is the result of sin—both our own and the sin of others.

It may be a result of our own sin (v. 10 – “my iniquity').

There are some who “glory in their shame” (Philippians 3:19).

Their minds are “set on earthly things.”

This is what it means to be “shameless."

It may stem from the sin of others (v. 15 – “my persecutors”).

“Lying lips” (v. 18)

There are some who experience “illegitimate shame.”

They are ashamed of things that have been done to them.

Shame is experienced in the context of relationships.

Adversaries, neighbors, acquaintances, strangers (v. 12)

Shame drives addiction and results from addiction.

Shame often leads to acts of aggression (e.g. arson, murder).

Shame is not the same as guilt.

Guilt is focused on what we have done.

Shame is focused on who we are.

Shame is a necessary part of being reconciled to God.

“Without shame, there is no real repentance.” – Thomas Watson

“Pray for the grace to be ashamed.” – J. I. Packer, Knowing God.

The opposite of shame is righteousness (v. 1).

We need what only Jesus can give us.




2.  Where Will You Hide?

You can either bear your own shame or let Jesus bear it for you.

On the cross, Jesus bore the shame of our sin.

God offers the perfect righteousness of Christ to cover our shame.

By God's grace, we can learn to speak the language of faith.

You can hide from Jesus in shame (Lk. 5:8) or in Jesus (Jn. 21:7).